How to discuss risks with decision makers?

How to discuss risks with decision makers?

When talking about the risks in a recent Board paper with a Chief Technology Officer for a national retailer, he said something very interesting.

The risks section SHOULD make us feel uncomfortable.

His view was that if we highlight the things that are keeping us up at night and can demonstrate how well we have thought them through they will trust us more.

I found this interesting as I at times see risks being discussed in a ‘tick a box' fashion or alternatively being played down to reduce political rather than practical risk.

Given his view was so clear and strong vs what I so often see, I wanted to unpack his reasoning to help you too …

If we do share what keeps us up at night three things will happen. We

  • can be confident that the leadership will trust us
  • will enjoy a much more robust discussion that leads to a better outcome for the business
  • might just sleep better

If, alternatively, we are ‘gilding the lily' by only discussing the positives, leaders won’t trust us – and neither they should.

In his words: if we play it safe we would let both them and ourselves down as it demonstrates that we

  • haven't thought our proposition through deeply enough to be taken seriously
  • aren't ready to handle the inevitable risks we will face in delivering on our commitments
  • lack the courage to lead

This was food for thought to me and will push me to focus more intently on how risks are articulated in communication I help my clients prepare.

What about you?

How openly do you discuss the risks as you see them when lying awake at night?

I hope that helps. More next week.

Kind regards,
Davina

PRESENTED BY DAVINA STANLEY

Davina has helped smart people all over the world clarify and communicate complex ideas for 20+ years.

She began this work when she joined McKinsey & Company as a communication specialist in Hong Kong where she helped others use the Minto Pyramid Principle. She continued helping others when living in New York, Tokyo and now back in Australia.

Her clients include experts across many disciplines across Australia, Asia Pacific, New Zealand, the UK and the US. She currently coaches a number of C-suite executives as well as many mid-level folk.

Get her 4 Tips for Communicating Complex Ideas here.

The best strategy ‘hack’ so far …

The best strategy ‘hack’ so far …

At this time of year I am naturally starting to think about what comes next.

Oddly, this also involves bicycles and icecream.

For me it is time to lock critical dates in my diary, checking in with clients to see what they are looking for in the coming year and generally planning ahead.

It's tricky to find time for this as my plate is already full.

This year, unusually so as one of my team is in hospital so I have picked up two extra programs so we don't let a client down.

All this occurs while I am determined to continue adding more value to both my clients and my business while not burning the midnight oil.

I'm old enough to know that burning too much of it is counter productive.

So, what to do?

#1 – The usual – keep myself organised, focusing on the most important things first. Declutter, prioritise, optimise: This, however, doesn't always cut the list of ‘to dos' nearly far enough.

#2 – The still usual – focus on ‘the now' so I don't suffer from overwhelm by thinking about that growing to-do list

#3 – The new thing – rather than forcing myself to stop thinking about the list, actively think about the exciting plans I have for the business and let that list take care of itself.

It's a bit like when learning to ride a bike: as soon as we start focusing on the tree we don't want to hit we head straight for it. Instead, focus on the path that we do want to ride on.

Strangely enough this has been the most powerful hack of all.

By focusing more on the next big thing (which in itself is something I find motivating) I am finding that what I call the ‘ice cream theory' of time management works a treat.

Have you noticed that children ALWAYS have room for ice cream?

Strangely, I'm getting the old things and the new things done during moderately sensible hours.

Even better. I'm sleeping like a top, which means I have lots of energy to do both the things I have to do and the things I want to do.

What is the next big thing that will have a big impact on what you need to achieve for 2022?

Kind regards,
Davina

 

 

PS – In no way do I mean to belittle the ‘hacks' from last year. They have been hugely useful. They have laid the groundwork for me to be able to prioritise and focus on the good stuff. I hope they help as you plan for 2022 also.

It's time to plan for 2022 …

Over the last year I have continued working toward using my time better and becoming more impactful generally.

Next week I'll share my ‘big aha' with you that has helped fix the one problem that optimising my time spent did NOT fix.

Here's the back story to start you thinking ….

++++++++++++++++++++

Hack 1 – Diagnose and Declutter

Clarity First alum Steve shares ideas on how he transitioned from being an engineer to becoming a strategic leader who takes nights and weekends off as well as going sailing most Wednesday afternoons. Click here to learn from Steve and grab hold of a template that will help you start your own journey toward becoming maximising your impact while minimising your effort.

Hack 2 – Prioritise

We all know we need to prioritise …. but HOW do we do that so we know which tasks we should eliminate, delegate, automate or do? In this post I turn to a favourite of mine: Michael Hyatt to capture some practical ideas from his excellent Free to Focus book. Click here to learn more.

Hack 3 – Optimise

This time I point you to my first substantive conversation with Richard Medcalf of Xquadrant who specialises in helping successful people magnify their impact. He offers a number of terrific ideas including how to:

  • Harness your curiosity to increase your influence
  • Lead strategically when there is already too much to do
  • Use a concept called prisons and fortresses to make sure you get to the things that really matter
  • And plenty more too. Click here to learn more.

Hack 4 – Bonus ideas

I found this process so useful that I wanted to share some final ideas stemming from my own experience in learning from Steve, Michael and Richard. Go beyond the theory to get some more ideas here.

PRESENTED BY DAVINA STANLEY

Davina has helped smart people all over the world clarify and communicate complex ideas for 20+ years.

She began this work when she joined McKinsey & Company as a communication specialist in Hong Kong where she helped others use the Minto Pyramid Principle. She continued helping others when living in New York, Tokyo and now back in Australia.

Her clients include experts across many disciplines across Australia, Asia Pacific, New Zealand, the UK and the US. She currently coaches a number of C-suite executives as well as many mid-level folk.

Get her 4 Tips for Communicating Complex Ideas here.

How to avoid decision makers derailing your presentation

How to avoid decision makers derailing your presentation

Has this happened to you?

You have an important presentation to make to a senior leadership group and a big chunk of the time is spent talking about ‘background’.

The leaders ask every question under the sun about the history of the program, what you have done in the past and you find yourself repeating your last five presentations. You use precious face time with them looking backwards rather than looking forwards.

This was a hot topic in today’s coaching session with the Senior People Leader at an Australian retailer.

The problem – ‘Mary’ was going into way too much detail in the introduction.

Mary would brace herself for these discussions as they felt a bit like an interrogation and to head off the questions, she included lots of background up front.

She referred to the history of the People Strategy and went into quite some detail about it.

However, in doing this she was also leaving the door open for questions as the first part of her paper wasn’t a complete summary, or perhaps described past events using new words which piqued the Board’s curiosity.

Her strategy was backfiring.

To avoid this, we suggest taking the following three steps

  1. ​​Tightening your introduction to lead your audience directly where you want them to go (to the So What). 
  2. Including information in the introduction that introduces your topic as it stands right now, avoiding significant backstory
  3. Linking out to past papers so any decision makers who are new to the group can catch up on any history they were not there to experience.

I hope that helps and look forward to checking in with you again next week.

Kind regards,
Davina


PRESENTED BY DAVINA STANLEY

Davina has helped smart people all over the world clarify and communicate complex ideas for 20+ years.

She began this work when she joined McKinsey & Company as a communication specialist in Hong Kong where she helped others use the Minto Pyramid Principle. She continued helping others when living in New York, Tokyo and now back in Australia.

Her clients include experts across many disciplines across Australia, Asia Pacific, New Zealand, the UK and the US. She currently coaches a number of C-suite executives as well as many mid-level folk.

Get her 4 Tips for Communicating Complex Ideas here.

Intensive Program Information

 

Clarity First was incredibly useful.

It provided a framework through which I can structure my initial thoughts quickly and easily.

I have always been ok at delivering communications but the tools Davina taught me not only make the communications clearer and more concise, but have also greatly reduced the time taken to get to the end point.

I recommend the course to anyone who wants to make existing skills even better, or for those that want to create the foundations of great communication.

Michaela Flanagan

GM Performance and Strategy, Insurance industry

Hi Davina
I did your course last year. I found it extremely userful and continue to use the So What framework. I find it's a bullet-proof method for communicating anything!
I am now in a new role and Execs hae noticed a difference in how I communicate ideas – that they are clear, succinct and actionable, thanks to you!
I am softlly pushing to my manager (the COO) that we should get the execs and leads of the business to take your course so we can uplift the quality of our communication and way of thinking. He is interested to hear from you.
Let's arrange a time for a call.
Regards,
Bianca

Product Manager, Sydney, Australia

PRESENTED BY DAVINA STANLEY

Davina has helped smart people all over the world clarify and communicate complex ideas for 20+ years.

She began this work when she joined McKinsey & Company as a communication specialist in Hong Kong where she helped others use the Minto Pyramid Principle. She continued helping others when living in New York, Tokyo and now back in Australia.

Her clients include experts across many disciplines across Australia, Asia Pacific, New Zealand, the UK and the US. She currently coaches a number of C-suite executives as well as many mid-level folk.

Get her 4 Tips for Communicating Complex Ideas here.

5 Business Communication Traps and how to avoid them

Complexity is at the heart of the challenge when communicating at work.

In this workshop I address five of the common traps that make it difficult for us to engage others in complex ideas and offer ideas on how to solve them.

    Click the play button below to learn more and here to download the handout and here for more program information and here for information for your manager.

     

    Communicate with Clarity and Confidence

    TWO LEARNING PATHWAYS AVAILABLE – 

    INTENSIVE – A structured and directed three-month program indepdendant learning program. Includes six highly interactive live workshops starting 22 September 2021 and running through to 27 October.

    CLASSIC – A self-directed blended learning program supported by regular live workshops. During the workshops we build pieces of communication together and address specific participant questions.

    REGISTRATIONS CLOSE 6 SEPTEMBER AT 9PM AEST.

    Hi Davina
    I did your course last year. I found it extremely userful and continue to use the So What framework. I find it's a bullet-proof method for communicating anything!
    I am now in a new role and Execs hae noticed a difference in how I communicate ideas – that they are clear, succinct and actionable, thanks to you!
    I am softlly pushing to my manager (the COO) that we should get the execs and leads of the business to take your course so we can uplift the quality of our communication and way of thinking. He is interested to hear from you.
    Let's arrange a time for a call.
    Regards,
    Bianca

    Product Manager, Sydney, Australia

    Hi Davina
    It’s s funny to listen to myself 🙂
    Perfectly happy for you to use however you would like.
    FYI – I also got an award for my great work today.  Nothing big but still, the recognition was nice.  I feel like much of it was thanks to the work I’ve done with you!
    Thanks for creating such a great program.
    See you next week!
    Cerise
    PS You can go here to hear Cerise's story along with that from several other program participants
    Cerise

    Program Manager, Sydney, Australia

    This was the best course I have done. I was always confident in my reasoning but not as confident with presenting it, particularly to audiences that were not on my wavelength.

    Davina has shown me how to organise my high level messages which gets me a better response from my audiences.

    In fact, when I used the approach to present to the sales team last week half of them came up to me individually afterwards to compliment me on my presentation. That has never happened before!

    Bojana

    Customer Experience Advisor, Sydney, Australia

     

    Clarity First was incredibly useful for me as it has provided a framework through which I am able to structure my initial thoughts quickly and easily.

    I have always been OK at delivering communications, but the tools Davina has taught me will not only make the communications clearer and more concise but the time taken to get to the end point has reduced greatly.

    I recommend the course to anyone who wants to make existing skills even better or for those that want to create the foundations for great communication.

    Michaela Flanagan

    GM Performance and Strategy, Insurance Industry

    Keywords: Art and Science of communicating complex ideas, workshop, free

    When using questions can be a bad idea

    When using questions can be a bad idea

    An email came across my desk this week as I was thinking about the most useful idea for you that would build on last week's focus of ‘saying what you mean'.

    It was an email from a tool that I use which was structured around a list of questions (see below).

    To me, using questions like this misses a big opportunity for a coherent story and makes the audience work far too hard to grasp the main idea. Here are the problems I see with structuring communication around questions with one caveat:

    The problem: structuring communication around questions almost guarantees your audience will miss your point

    #1 – By highlighting the questions in bold, you are prioritising it over the answer. This then leaves you exposed to the risk that the audience may decide your communication is not important enough to invest the time needed for them to find your message.

    #2 – By using questions as the main structuring device, you are at risk of providing your audience with the raw data rather than a coherent message that describes what the data means to your audience.

    I have often seen people identify the questions they need to answer to solve a problem, collect the evidence and then send the list of questions with their evidence underneath as their ‘communication'.

    This strategy ensures that both you and your audience miss the point. Your audience is less likely to get your message in part because you haven't articulated it to yourself.

    The caveat: FAQs can be useful when combined with a powerful story

    As a final caveat, I do understand that there are times that it is useful to have a series of FAQs (frequently asked questions), perhaps at the end of a presentation or information package. You will have seen our own FAQs on our site, for example.

    This is not the same as focusing your whole communication around the questions, which I would caution against.

    Cheers, Davina

    Keywords: #questions #synthesis #structure

     

    PRESENTED BY DAVINA STANLEY

    Davina has helped smart people all over the world clarify and communicate complex ideas for 20+ years.

    She began this work when she joined McKinsey & Company as a communication specialist in Hong Kong where she helped others use the Minto Pyramid Principle. She continued helping others when living in New York, Tokyo and now back in Australia.

    Her clients include experts across many disciplines across Australia, Asia Pacific, New Zealand, the UK and the US. She currently coaches a number of C-suite executives as well as many mid-level folk.

    Get her 4 Tips for Communicating Complex Ideas here.

    How to correlate your effort with your end game

    How to correlate your effort with your end game

    Do you wonder how much effort to invest in different pieces of communication?

    Do you prioritise according to …

    • who your audience is
    • the type of document it is (email, paper, PowerPoint?)
    • how much time you have to prepare it, or
    • the business impact it will generate?

    Let's use two routine examples that emerged in my coaching work this week to think about this and refine how we think about each of them using a simple framework.

    First, two routine examples to set the scene

    Imagine you have two emails to prepare today:

    Example 1: A 250 word email seeking leadership support. You need your five-person leadership team to agree to change the course of your project in light of complications caused by an unexpected technical glitch.

    The change doesn't require any extra budget but does require your team to change their priorities which will lead to deprioritising another important project.

    Example 2: A 150 word email to 3,000 staff. You have discovered a new security vulnerability in the latest Google Chrome release and need the whole organisation to manually update their browser immediately.

    The steps that each of the 3,000 people need to take are simple but critical and you are aware that many of your employees are not ‘tech savvy' and may need explicit instructions to complete the update.

    So, how do you decide how to proceed?

    Next: a simple framework to help you prioritise your effort

    By thinking about two important dimensions: impact and size of audience, we get to a different conclusion.

    This allows us to correlate our effort and our end game by prioritising our effort according to a balance between the impact the communication will deliver and the risk of slowing the organisation down (or worse) if it goes wrong.

    And … a counter-intuitive conclusion

    Both of these examples need ‘proper' investment but using this approach we would pay more attention to the Google Chrome vulnerability email. Here's why:

    Although the email to all staff seemed fairly simple, the risks and potential time loss were both higher than that for the leadership email.

    If the staff email was poorly done, the cost to the organisation would have been substantial

    • The steps for updating the Chrome vulnerability were easy if you were ‘tech savvy', but could be time consuming if not. In the real situation it proved to be easy to convolute the steps confusing colleagues and leaving a real possibility that they would give up. Aggregate this over 3,000 people and the cost to the organisation of getting it wrong is pretty big.
    • The current risk of being hacked is also intense for this organisation, making the risk of not updating the browsers higher than normal.

    If the leadership email was poorly done, the cost would have been less significant

    • The cost to the organisation of the ‘hourly rate' of these leaders taking time to ask questions to clarify the message is less than the potential time cost of the staff email
    • The risks to the organisation are minimal as no extra budget or skills were required and time lost could be caught up in other ways if the project needed to return to the original schedule
    • The project leader is likely to have other opportunities to put their case in the not too distant future should there be confusion stemming from the email

    I hope that provides some food for thought this week and look forward to sharing more ideas with you next week.

    Kind regards,
    Davina

    ‘Pitch your boss' kit to help you this budget season
    If you want your manager to invest in your development, you need to do your homework before you have the conversation. Your manager will want to know exactly why this is the right program for you and how it will help the team and the organisation. We have provided a brochure, a draft script and some steps to follow to help you prepare for your conversation. Clarity First opens again in September

    PRESENTED BY DAVINA STANLEY

    Davina has helped smart people all over the world clarify and communicate complex ideas for 20+ years.

    She began this work when she joined McKinsey & Company as a communication specialist in Hong Kong where she helped others use the Minto Pyramid Principle. She continued helping others when living in New York, Tokyo and now back in Australia.

    Her clients include experts across many disciplines across Australia, Asia Pacific, New Zealand, the UK and the US. She currently coaches a number of C-suite executives as well as many mid-level folk.

    Get her 4 Tips for Communicating Complex Ideas here.

    How ‘constraints’ help create meaning

    How ‘constraints’ help create meaning

    It is fascinating to me that the whole idea of ‘constraints' feels like more of a limitation than a liberation.

    Nobody – me included – likes being kept in physical or intellectual shackles and yet they are incredibly powerful. Liberating, even.

    If we trust a simple set of constraints – rules – we can invest our thinking energy where it has most impact.

    In the case of preparing communication, this means creating greater meaning as economically as possible.

    This has been more evident than usual in my coaching sessions in past weeks and I wanted to share an example with you.

    When coaching a finance executive yesterday, we went from making bland and frankly boring statements to communicating impactful ideas by using constraints.

    In this particular case, our main message needed to be a recommendation rather than an observation. Let me show you what I mean:

    Observation – We are allocating unspent funds to teams that have demonstrated that they can be compliant with the ABC policy funding agreement

    Recommendation – We recommend allocating the unspent funds to teams that have invested in a step-change in talent development

    The second version is so much more meaningful – and interesting. It is also the result of sticking to some simple rules, or ‘constraints' that push for clarity and insight.

    Similarly, we have been talking about constraints in the problem solving context during the recent Clarity in Problem Solving program.

    I was delighted to see in a recent HBR article that I am not alone in encouraging people to stick to some simple constraints.

    >> Click here to access the article and another recent one by me on the topic of constraints also.

    I hope you find it as interesting as I did.

    PRESENTED BY DAVINA STANLEY

    Davina has helped smart people all over the world clarify and communicate complex ideas for 20+ years.

    She began this work when she joined McKinsey & Company as a communication specialist in Hong Kong where she helped others use the Minto Pyramid Principle. She continued helping others when living in New York, Tokyo and now back in Australia.

    Her clients include experts across many disciplines across Australia, Asia Pacific, New Zealand, the UK and the US. She currently coaches a number of C-suite executives as well as many mid-level folk.

    Get her 4 Tips for Communicating Complex Ideas here.

    2 Critical Ingredients for Making Complex Stories Look Simple

    2 Critical Ingredients for Making Complex Stories Look Simple

    Last week I mentioned that I have been working on some huge stories lately, and that these have been instructive in many ways.

    One of the most comforting is that even huge stories look simple when they are done: it's just that the process for getting there isn't so simple.

    By trusting the process and the structures and continuing to ask ‘Why?' when it didn't look right, we landed a super simple story that packed a powerful punch.

    Here are two key takeaways from our experience:

    Trust the storylining process and structures together with your instincts to land the story
    Keep asking ‘Why?' to make what is obvious to you obvious to your audience

    On the surface, these two ideas appear simple too. Trust me when I tell you that our heads really hurt after our session even though our story looked incredibly simple too.

     

    Trust the process and structures together with your instincts to land the story. If I reflect back on why we were able to land a simple and clear message for the $1bn savings story, it was because the stakes were too high if we did not.

    The team could not afford to have the Minister ‘unpick' the messaging given they wanted a major shift away from the Minister's preferred approach for prioritising investment initiatives.

    So, the challenge was to find a high-level structure that resonated and to deliver it with precision and skill, listening both to our instincts as well as our structures.

    We chose a Close The Gap deductive structure, and relied heavily on the finer detail within the deductive modules supported by The So What Strategy and the Ten Point Test to bring it home.

    While it took a while to agree on the high level structural pattern, it took much longer to make it ‘sing'.

     

    Keep asking ‘Why?' to make what is obvious to you obvious to your audience. The key that turned the lock for us was the answer to the age-old ‘dumb question': Why?

    Why was the team's approach better than the approach that the Minister was wedded to?

    This proved challenging and took quite some time to articulate as the team was so close to the problem and to their solution, which highlights a common challenge we all face.

    By the time we write our stories, we are ‘sold', so we want to move to how we will deliver the new program / project / or whatever we are discussing.

    However, our audience isn't there yet which means we need to shift our own heads back in time to surface our own reasoning.

    This is why it was so hard to say that ‘the greatest chance of successfully improving X system while cutting expenditure is ensuring that the division heads ‘own' the approach.

    On the surface that is so simple it's almost silly. However, trust me when I tell you it wasn't easy to get there.

    I suspect you are familiar with the challenge, which is why I thought it might be helpful to raise it here.

    So, in terms of next steps for you: I encourage you to think about opportunities within your own communication where you need to persist to articulate the ‘right why'.

    Wishing you a great week.

    Kind regards,
    Davina

     

    Keywords: deductive storylines, Close the Gap

    PRESENTED BY DAVINA STANLEY

    Davina has helped smart people all over the world clarify and communicate complex ideas for 20+ years.

    She began this work when she joined McKinsey & Company as a communication specialist in Hong Kong where she helped others use the Minto Pyramid Principle. She continued helping others when living in New York, Tokyo and now back in Australia.

    Her clients include experts across many disciplines across Australia, Asia Pacific, New Zealand, the UK and the US. She currently coaches a number of C-suite executives as well as many mid-level folk.

    Get her 4 Tips for Communicating Complex Ideas here.

    How ‘constraints’ can turbo charge your impact

    How ‘constraints’ can turbo charge your impact

    We have had a great start to the Clarity in Problem Solving Program and one topic that has jumped out to me during our initial two live workshops has been ‘constraints'.

    It is I think human (or maybe just me?!) to shy away from constraints and prefer to trust our own judgement and processes.

    However, my experience in helping people deliver greater impact when solving problems and communicating is that they are hugely powerful.

    Let me first illustrate with a personal example and then expand into the professional before offering you a practical challenge.

    Personal: a clever idea for using space driven by constraints

    An article in a local magazine caught my eye some time ago. It described a clever renovation undertaken by some locals who loved their neighbourhood and wanted to ‘stay put' despite having a small terrace home and a growing family.

    This drove at least three constraints: staying within the current small home, adding two young children combined with heritage rules that did not allow them to expand their footprint, either out or up.

    The idea that I thought would make Mari Kondo the most proud was their idea to use the space under the floor boards for toy storage.

    They built a discrete hatch that enabled them to sweep up and hide the day's mess, enabling them to use their living area multiple ways.

    I thought that was a clever and practical example of constraints driving creativity and unexpected results.

    I have not seen any other renovation take advantage of this space and suspect their space constraints were pushing them to think harder than most when redesigning their home.

    Professional: opportunities for us to get creative also

    I have many examples of where constraints have proved to be more help than hindrance in a professional setting, but let me offer just a couple to give you some ideas.

    Amazon's culture of frugality. Amazon has 14 leadership principles which it ‘sticks to' across the organisation. Frugality is Number 10, and is described as follows:

    Accomplish more with less. Constraints breed resourcefulness, self-sufficiency, and invention. There are no extra points for growing headcount, budget size, or fixed expense.

    This is one of the approaches that helps Amazon maintain its ‘startup' culture, and avoids the risk of corporate bloat as the business grows.

    ‘Rules' for structuring ideas. We have developed a set of 10 ‘rules' for evaluating the rigour with which we map our ideas on a page when solving problems and also separately when communicating.

    Sticking to these rules helps us test whether we are focusing on the right question, whether we have mapped the problem or the ‘story' out completely and powerfully.

    It's not about having a ‘pretty page' but rather ensuring our thinking stacks up.

    We have learned from experience that not just understanding the principles that underpin these rules, such as MECE for example, but trusting our internal radar that spots an anomaly. This matters even when we see something small, and when we can't articulate what is wrong but sense something is out of line.

    As one of my team said to a new client recently, “We trust that the combination of your contextual expertise plus our process will deliver the right outcomes”.

    Challenge: A simple way to introduce a powerful constraint into your world

    So, here's a challenge for you: where can you introduce a constraint into your world to magnify your impact?

    It could be as simple as either yourself or whoever manages your diary honouring the regular block of ‘thinking time' you set in your diary each week.

    A coaching client of mine was this morning marvelling at the difference a new assistant was making. The assistant was pushing back on colleagues to avoid overwriting my client's ‘thinking time' blocks with other peoples' priorities.

    This has revolutionised my client's week, giving her the space she needs to deliver real impact.

    I hope that helps and look forward to sharing more ideas next week.

    Kind regards,
    Davina

     

     

    PRESENTED BY DAVINA STANLEY

    Davina has helped smart people all over the world clarify and communicate complex ideas for 20+ years.

    She began this work when she joined McKinsey & Company as a communication specialist in Hong Kong where she helped others use the Minto Pyramid Principle. She continued helping others when living in New York, Tokyo and now back in Australia.

    Her clients include experts across many disciplines across Australia, Asia Pacific, New Zealand, the UK and the US. She currently coaches a number of C-suite executives as well as many mid-level folk.

    Get her 4 Tips for Communicating Complex Ideas here.

    How to Communicate the Right Amount of Detail

    Clarity has never been easy.

    But as we discuss in this workshop, we have a number of great techniques to make it achievable in your everyday work life.

    We look at three simple steps to help you communicate the right amount of detail:

    1.  Know that being shorter isn't always better
    2. Be crystal clear about your purpose and audience
    3. Learn how to synthesise

    We explore our ‘So What Strategy' framework which provides you with a roadmap each time you prepare a communication.

    We also explain how Clarity First can help you consistently create clear and powerful communications that give your audience the information they need, so you have the best chance of getting the outcome you want.

    New job offer after ‘Best Ever’ Presentation

    Brendon was offered a new job on the back of a ‘best ever’ presentation

     You might also like to hear how Brendon was asked to repeat his interview presentation so it could be used as a training video.

    They said it was the best presentation they had seen and, of course, offered him the job on the spot.

    Brendon landed here having been a lateral hire into a Big 4 firm who needed to catch up on the sort of training that longer-tenured consultants had received. 

    Clarity First filled the gap for him, and many other senior consultants who want to polish their skills so they can level up their careers.

    Hear it from Brendon…

     

     

    Learn how Brendon achieved this.

    Hear from other program participants

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    Promoted because of communication skills

    We are always delighted to hear success stories like this from our participants.

    Elle was recently promoted because she improved her communication skills after just 3 months in the Clarity First Program.

    Naturally she was delighted to move from director to senior account director. She had been in her role for a bit over a year and was ready.

    Her boss told her that to move to the next level, she had just two things to conquer and that Clarity First was ‘all she needed’ to get over the line.

     

    Hear what Elle has to say about how Clarity First has helped her succeed… 

     

    Learn how Elle achieved this.

    Hear from other program participants

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    PRESENTED BY DAVINA STANLEY

    Davina has helped smart people all over the world clarify and communicate complex ideas for 20+ years.

    She began this work when she joined McKinsey & Company as a communication specialist in Hong Kong where she helped others use the Minto Pyramid Principle. She continued helping others when living in New York, Tokyo and now back in Australia.

    Her clients include experts across many disciplines across Australia, Asia Pacific, New Zealand, the UK and the US. She currently coaches a number of C-suite executives as well as many mid-level folk.

    Get her 4 Tips for Communicating Complex Ideas here.

    Thinking Tools #10 – Preventing unintended consequences

    Thinking Tools #10 – Preventing unintended consequences

    It is not often that I roar laughing when reading a book about thinking.

    Did you know that during their colonial rule of India, the British government took steps to curb the numbers of venomous cobras in Delhi?

    To cut the numbers, they instituted a reward for every dead snake brought to officials.

    How did the populous respond?

    By breeding snakes to slaughter and present for a bounty.

    The number of cobras was worse than ever as the officials had not thought through second-order consequences.

     

    “Stupidity is the same as evil if you judge by the results”

    Margaret Attwood

     

    I am certain that all of us can think of analogous situations, where we or others have made decisions that have led to unintended consequences.

    As I was reading this section of Shane Parrish’s Great Mental Models v1, I was focused on assessing the validity of a proposition more than on its usefulness to communication.

    It turns out, though, that Shane was ahead of me.

    He offers two areas where second-order thinking can be used to great effect

    1. Prioritising long-term interests over immediate gains to avoid problematic unintended consequences
    2. Using positive consequences as a selling point when constructing effective arguments

    Prioritising long-term interests over immediate gains to avoid problematic unintended consequences.

    If you like history, this section is worth reading. It talks about the choices Cleopatra made in 48BC when in exile and at great risk of being murdered by her brother.

    To survive, she had to think through some options: Should she work things out with her brother, try to marshal support from another country, or align herself with Caesar?

    The rest is history, of course. She took some short-term political pain by aligning with Caesar which was rewarded over the longer term by a close relationship with Rome.

     

    Using positive consequences as a selling point when constructing effective arguments

    As I mentioned, my initial thinking when reading this chapter was largely about the value of thinking through the ‘what happens next’ type of question. If I do A, what will then happen?

    Will I cut or add to the number of cobras by offering a bounty for dead ones?

    Shane offers a different take on it, however, and refers to another great woman of history.

    Mary Wollstencraft successfully argued for the education of women because this would in turn make them better wives and mothers, more able to both support themselves and raise smart, conscientious children.

    She did not initially focus on a woman’s right to education’, but rather the benefits to others of women being educated.

    (Thankyou Mary!)

     

    This will be my last post in this series for a while as next week I introduce a series all about communicating with impact. It includes four new videos that I hope you will find useful.

    Have a great week!

    Cheers,
    Davina

     

    PS – I receive a small commission if you click the link and decide to purchase a copy of Shane's book from Amazon.

    Related posts include:

     Past posts from this series …  

    1. A fabulous thinking tool to help you solve problems and communicate 
    2. Further thinking tools
    3. Thinking Tools #3 – Using inversions to identify gaps in our thinking
    4. Thinking Tools #4 – Getting out of your own way 
    5. Thinking Tools #5 – Avoiding Blind Spots
    6. Thinking Tools #6 – How to have a latticework of theory
    7. Thinking Tools #7 – Avoiding becoming a tragic tale  
    8. Thinking Tools #8 – How corporate templates can frustrate clarity 
    9. Thinking Tools #9 – Avoid the ‘we have always done it that way' trap.

     

     

    Key words: critical thinking, thinking tools, design your strategy

     

    PRESENTED BY DAVINA STANLEY

    Davina has helped smart people all over the world clarify and communicate complex ideas for 20+ years.

    She began this work when she joined McKinsey & Company as a communication specialist in Hong Kong where she helped others use the Minto Pyramid Principle. She continued helping others when living in New York, Tokyo and now back in Australia.

    Her clients include experts across many disciplines across Australia, Asia Pacific, New Zealand, the UK and the US. She currently coaches a number of C-suite executives as well as many mid-level folk.

    Get her 4 Tips for Communicating Complex Ideas here.

    Thinking Tools #9 – Avoiding the ‘we have always done it that way’ trap

    Thinking Tools #9 – Avoiding the ‘we have always done it that way’ trap

    Growing up we were told a story.

    Every Christmas a woman would cut the leg off the turkey before putting it into a very large oven. 

    When asked why she took the leg off, she said: “It is the way my mother taught me”. She had never questioned it. In her mind, this was just a normal part of cooking a turkey.

    The woman’s mother had a small oven, and so needed to cut the leg of the turkey off so it would fit inside. Her daughter did not. 

    In our work it also helps to understand the reasons why people do things rather than just focusing on what they do.

    Yet again, Shane Parrish has surfaced some useful thinking skills in his book Great Mental Models v1.

     

    “First principles thinking helps us avoid the problem of relying on someone else’s tactics without understanding the rationale behind them”

     

    This week I am focusing on two ideas that help us use first principles thinking, both to do with asking great questions. 

    The first technique is Socratic questioning 

    This technique is useful for us both as we craft our communication and as we evaluate it, or potentially evaluate other peoples’ communication. Shane offers six questions for us to use:

    1. Clarifying your thinking and explaining the origins of your ideas. He suggests asking two questions: Why do I think this? What exactly do I think? In Clarity First we focus intently on these two questions, and particularly on articulating what we do think so we can explain that to our audience in short order.
    2. Challenging assumptions. How do I know this is true? What if I thought the opposite? These are two great questions to use to ‘freshen up our eyes’ so we can see through the substance of our communication rather than just the superficial presentation.
    3. Looking for evidence. How can I back this up? What are the sources? Again, this is something we focus on in Clarity First. We offer specific strategies to help participants test their ideas and the way they are ‘strung together’ to form a coherent piece of communication.
    4. Considering alternative perspectives. What might others think? How do I know I am correct? The way we recommend participants socialise their communication with key stakeholders addresses this point.
    5. Examining consequences and implications. What if I am wrong? What are the consequences if I am? Terrific questions to ask yourself when preparing high stakes communication in particular.
    6. Questioning the original questions. Why did I think that? Was I correct? What conclusions can I draw from the reasoning process? If we are talking about first principles, these last three questions are gold for those who want to stop relying on their gut and limit emotive responses.
    Second: The Five Why’s method

    If you have ever had much to do with young children, you will know where this has come from! 

    We use this technique specifically when clarifying the purpose of our communication. It is about systematically delving into your purpose statement so you can eradicate inaccurate assumptions.

    Are you sure you are going to achieve ABC with that specific piece of communication, or that one particular interaction?

    We encourage participants to spend the time to become super clear about this as this single statement (which does not even appear in their communication) is key to cutting the number of revisions they will make after drafting. 

    I hope you find that useful and look forward to sharing more ideas with you next week.

    Davina

     

    Related posts include:

     Past posts from this series …  

    1. A fabulous thinking tool to help you solve problems and communicate 
    2. Further thinking tools
    3. Thinking Tools #3 – Using inversions to identify gaps in our thinking
    4. Thinking Tools #4 – Getting out of your own way 
    5. Thinking Tools #5 – Avoiding Blind Spots
    6. Thinking Tools #6 – How to have a latticework of theory
    7. Thinking Tools #7 – Avoiding becoming a tragic tale  
    8. Thinking Tools #8 – How corporate templates can frustrate clarity 

    PS – Our new kit for ‘pitching your manager' is now available. It includes an updated program brochure as well as a script you may like to cut and paste into your email or use to guide your conversation with your manager. Click here to learn more.

    PPS – I receive a small commission if you click the link and decide to purchase a copy of Shane's book from Amazon.

     

    Key words: critical thinking, thinking tools, design your strategy

     

    PRESENTED BY DAVINA STANLEY

    Davina has helped smart people all over the world clarify and communicate complex ideas for 20+ years.

    She began this work when she joined McKinsey & Company as a communication specialist in Hong Kong where she helped others use the Minto Pyramid Principle. She continued helping others when living in New York, Tokyo and now back in Australia.

    Her clients include experts across many disciplines across Australia, Asia Pacific, New Zealand, the UK and the US. She currently coaches a number of C-suite executives as well as many mid-level folk.

    Get her 4 Tips for Communicating Complex Ideas here.

    Thinking Tools #8 – How corporate templates can frustrate clarity

    Thinking Tools #8 – How corporate templates can frustrate clarity

    This week’s insight from Shane Parrish’s The Great Mental Models offers some useful ways to test our mental maps.

    In the chapter called ‘The Map is Not the Territory’, he talks about problems that the disconnect between reality and a map (or model) can bring and offers three tips for avoiding those problems. 

    Again, I have pondered on these and applied them to communication.

    Reality is the ultimate update. We need to be willing to change the way we think about a situation based on reality not institutional practice, our past views or habits.

    Corporate templates are a classic example here. It is easy to assume that because they are in common use, they are both fit for purpose and set in stone. Experience tells me neither is always true. Like anything, templates need to shift with reality.

    We have worked with many clients that have shifted not just their templates, but also their playbooks outlining their working process for solving problems as well as communicating.

    Consider the cartographer. Understanding who drew the map or designed the model is key. The model might be the way your predecessor communicated updates to your leadership team, or the template they used. It helps to understand them and their way of operating before following blindly.

    Many templates are created by frustrated leaders as a data collection tool. They design them so that teams provide leaders with the data they need. Unfortunately, they often don’t go a step further and leave room for the teams to tell a story based on that data.

    We have a module on ‘wrangling’ templates in Clarity First and also help where templates can benefit from a refresh. This will, in fact, be our topic of discussion for our first February working session.

    Maps can influence territories. This is an interesting and short point in this part of the book.

    In my mind, if a corporate template is a map outlining the rationale for a decision, then that template can certainly impact the territory of leadership discussions. We see this very often.

    If the map is poorly constructed, the discussions will lead to poor outcomes: clarification questions and delays rather than quality decisions made quickly. 

    As you can gather, templates are a bug bear of mine. They so often get in the way of powerful communication and quality decision making.

    Talk soon,
    Davina

     

    PS – Our new kit for ‘pitching your manager' is now available. It includes an updated program brochure as well as a script you may like to cut and paste into your email or use to guide your conversation with your manager. Click here to learn more.


    Related posts include:

     Past posts from this series … 

    1. A fabulous thinking tool to help you solve problems and communicate 
    2. Further thinking tools
    3. Thinking Tools #3 – Using inversions to identify gaps in our thinking
    4. Thinking Tools #4 – Getting out of your own way 
    5. Thinking Tools #5 – Avoiding Blind Spots
    6. Thinking Tools #6 – How to have a latticework of theory
    7. Thinking Tools #7 – Avoiding becoming a tragic tale 
    Past posts on thinking skills ….                                                                                                                                
     
    1. How to use your critical thinking abilities to turbo charge your communication
    2. Strengthen your critical thinking abilities
    3. 4 Ideas to make structured thinking stick

    PPSI receive a small commission if you click the link and decide to purchase a copy of Shane's book from Amazon.

    PRESENTED BY DAVINA STANLEY

    Davina has helped smart people all over the world clarify and communicate complex ideas for 20+ years.

    She began this work when she joined McKinsey & Company as a communication specialist in Hong Kong where she helped others use the Minto Pyramid Principle. She continued helping others when living in New York, Tokyo and now back in Australia.

    Her clients include experts across many disciplines across Australia, Asia Pacific, New Zealand, the UK and the US. She currently coaches a number of C-suite executives as well as many mid-level folk.

    Get her 4 Tips for Communicating Complex Ideas here.

    Thinking Tools #7 – How to engage self-interested stakeholders

    Thinking Tools #7 – How to engage self-interested stakeholders

    This week’s insight from Shane Parrish’s The Great Mental Models is all about understanding the motivations of people.

    This is central to understanding our audience, and Shane offers three particularly useful considerations for us in that regard.

    He offers a side-bar story calling us to beware ‘The Tragedy of the Commons’

    This is a parable best summed up with a quote from Aristotle:

     

    “What is common to many is taken least care of, for all men have greater regard            for what is their own than for what they possess in common with others.”

     

    In other words, people are highly self-interested.

    In preparing your communication we need to understand our audience’s interests deeply, if we are to get the results we seek.

    In Clarity First, we invest significantly here as we find that it is not at all uncommon to start preparing a piece of communication only to discover we aren't clear enough about not only who we are communicating with, but what we will communicate about.

    For example, I helped a product manager from a global technology company prepare a pitch recently that involved deep stakeholder analysis.

    We realised fairly quickly that there were a number of critical stakeholders who were neutral or potential objectors to her idea, and we took time to unpick their issues using our three-question stakeholder analysis framework.

    The patterns unearthed by the analysis helped her see that not only did she have some extra leg work to do before requesting resources from the leadership, but specifically what kind of leg work would help.

    She not only changed her story as a result of our 90 minutes together, but radically shifted her stakeholder engagement strategy and the way she presented the pitch itself.

    Next week I will have another post stemming from Shane's excellent book.

    Talk soon,
    Davina

     

     

    PS – Our new kit for ‘pitching your manager' is now available. It includes an updated program brochure as well as a script you may like to cut and paste into your email or use to guide your conversation with your manager. Click here to learn more.


    PPS – Related posts include:

     Past posts from this series … 

    1. A fabulous thinking tool to help you solve problems and communicate 
    2. Further thinking tools
    3. Thinking Tools #3 – Using inversions to identify gaps in our thinking
    4. Thinking Tools #4 – Getting out of your own way 
    5. Thinking Tools #5 – Avoiding Blind Spots
    6. Thinking Tools #6 – How to have a latticework of theory 
    Past posts on thinking skills ….
    1. How to use your critical thinking abilities to turbo charge your communication
    2. Strengthen your critical thinking abilities
    3. 4 Ideas to make structured thinking stick

     

    PPPS – I receive a small commission if you click the link and decide to purchase a copy of Shane's book from Amazon.

     

     

    PRESENTED BY DAVINA STANLEY

    Davina has helped smart people all over the world clarify and communicate complex ideas for 20+ years.

    She began this work when she joined McKinsey & Company as a communication specialist in Hong Kong where she helped others use the Minto Pyramid Principle. She continued helping others when living in New York, Tokyo and now back in Australia.

    Her clients include experts across many disciplines across Australia, Asia Pacific, New Zealand, the UK and the US. She currently coaches a number of C-suite executives as well as many mid-level folk.

    Get her 4 Tips for Communicating Complex Ideas here.

    Thinking Tools #6 – Why you need a latticework of models in your head

    Thinking Tools #6 – Why you need a latticework of models in your head

     This week’s post leads me to talk about patterns, which we find to be an essential communication tool.

     

    Shane Parrish of The Great Mental Models quotes Charlie Munger in this regard. He discusses the importance of relying on a ‘latticework of theory’ rather than ‘banging back facts’.

     

    “The first rule is that you can’t really know anything if you just remember isolated facts and try and bang ‘em back. 

    If the facts don’t hang together in a latticework of theory, you don’t have them in a usable form … 

    You’ve got to hang experience on a latticework of models in your head.”

    In our world, we work with a number of models, but most particularly grouping and deductive storylines.

    These two mental models blend synthesis and logic to distil and deliver powerful messages.

    We have gone further than using these two models alone and developed patterns that provide useful models for our clients who need to communicate complex ideas.

    We introduce these in The So What Strategy and help people take full advantage of them in Clarity First by doing three things.

    1. Learn the foundational principles of synthesisgrouping and deductive structures, which we focus on during our initial Warm Up and Core levels of the program.
    2. Identify which of the seven most commonly used patterns suit your purposes best. This is for people who have completed the Core Curriculum and then progressed to the Sprint Level.
    3. Establish which situations merit a ‘flip’ of one or more patterns, where you leverage your understanding of the basic principles to modify a pattern to suit your specific needs. We had a great discussion about this recently with our most advanced members who are at what we call the Momentum level. Having the depth of understanding combined with the intellectual agility to adjust the patterns quickly to suit your needs is a fabulous thinking ability.

     >> Click here to join the waitlist for the 2021 Clarity First Program. We’ll let you know as soon as the doors open, given we are offering only 50 places this time.

    You may also like to get a copy of our ‘Pitch Your Boss' kit, which includes text that you can cut and paste into an email seeking support to join the program.

    Davina

     


    PS – Related posts include:

    Past posts from this series …

    1. A fabulous thinking tool to help you solve problems and communicate 
    2. Further thinking tools
    3. Thinking Tools #3 – Using inversions to identify gaps in our thinking
    4. Thinking Tools #4 – Getting out of your own way 
    5. Thinking Tools #5 – Avoiding Blind Spots
    Past posts on thinking skills …
    1. How to use your critical thinking abilities to turbo charge your communication
    2. Strengthen your critical thinking abilities
    3. 4 Ideas to make structured thinking stick

     

    PPS – I receive a small commission if you click the link and decide to purchase a copy of Shane's book from Amazon.

     

    PRESENTED BY DAVINA STANLEY

    Davina has helped smart people all over the world clarify and communicate complex ideas for 20+ years.

    She began this work when she joined McKinsey & Company as a communication specialist in Hong Kong where she helped others use the Minto Pyramid Principle. She continued helping others when living in New York, Tokyo and now back in Australia.

    Her clients include experts across many disciplines across Australia, Asia Pacific, New Zealand, the UK and the US. She currently coaches a number of C-suite executives as well as many mid-level folk.

    Get her 4 Tips for Communicating Complex Ideas here.

    Thinking Tool #5 – Avoiding Blind Spots

    Thinking Tool #5 – Avoiding Blind Spots

    I loved my ‘fast fly’ through this book and am realizing how much more I am finding useful by going slowly and preparing these posts for you.

    Thank you for encouraging me to slow down!

    I am still in the introduction reading about the power and dangers associated with mental models and the concept of blind spots has jumped out at me as worth our attention.

    In the Great Mental Models Vol 1, Shane Parrish suggests that we need a latticework of mental models to be maximally effective.

    He quotes Alain de Botton from How to Make a Decision

    “The chief enemy of good decisions is a lack of sufficient perspectives on a problem”

    Taken together these points are a powerful reminder on how to avoid blind spots.

    Bring people together who have a variety of models in their heads to work through any problem. In our world of storylining, there are many ways to collaborate to get to a better answer faster.

    This week I was working with a group of product managers in a US technology company where collaboration was a key topic of discussion.

    The group has loved the specific way we have encouraged them to collaborate to ‘land their messaging’ that kills three birds with one stone: it integrates into their natural working rhythm, lifts the quality of their messaging and saves them time.

    These and others tell me that they no longer spend so much time chasing for responses, reworking their papers to present again and again to decision making bodies.

    They also have much more valuable discussions with members of these bodies. They receive fewer clarification questions and more substantive ones.

    We will take a break from our regular posts next week given the Christmas holiday season and will resume in the new year.

    We wish you all a wonderful holiday season.

     

    Warm regards,
    Davina

     

     

    Related posts include:

     Past posts from this series …

    1. A fabulous thinking tool to help you solve problems and communicate 
    2. Further thinking tools
    3. Thinking Tool #3 – Using inversions to identify gaps in our thinking
    4. Thinking Tool #4 – Getting out of your own way

    Past posts on thinking skills …                                                                                                                                   
    1. How to use your critical thinking abilities to turbo charge your communication
    2. Strengthen your critical thinking abilities 
    3. 4 Ideas to make structured thinking stick

     

    PS – There are two things to know about Clarity First this week: 

    1. Our new kit for ‘pitching your manager' is now available. It includes an updated program brochure as well as a script you may like to cut and paste into your email or use to guide your conversation with your manager. Click here to learn more.
    2. The waitlist is now open. Add your name to the list so you hear when the doors will open before anyone else. We are limiting participation to 50 new members this time.

    PPS – I receive a small commission if you click the link and decide to purchase a copy of Shane's book from Amazon.



     

    PRESENTED BY DAVINA STANLEY

    Davina has helped smart people all over the world clarify and communicate complex ideas for 20+ years.

    She began this work when she joined McKinsey & Company as a communication specialist in Hong Kong where she helped others use the Minto Pyramid Principle. She continued helping others when living in New York, Tokyo and now back in Australia.

    Her clients include experts across many disciplines across Australia, Asia Pacific, New Zealand, the UK and the US. She currently coaches a number of C-suite executives as well as many mid-level folk.

    Get her 4 Tips for Communicating Complex Ideas here.

    Thinking Tools #4 – Getting out of your own way

    Thinking Tools #4 – Getting out of your own way

    Given the positive feedback on this series so far, I have returned to the front of Great Mental Models so we can gain full value from this excellent book.

    In doing so I found a very useful set of ideas which relate directly to our need to communicate robust thinking.

    It’s all about perspective …

    “There are these two young fish swimming along and they happen to meet an older fish swimming the other way, who nods at them and says

    ‘Morning boys. How’s the water?’

    After a while one of the young fish turns to the other and goes ‘What the hell is water?’”


    In this early part of the book, Shane Parrish talks about three thinking failures: not having the right perspective or vantage point, ego-induced denial and distance from the consequences of our decisions.

    Others might describe these as cognitive biases, also a useful tool for checking ourselves.

    In our worlds these three thinking failures affect our decision making and hence our communication profoundly.

    In this post I am reinforcing some of what we cover in the core modules while also adding some extra nuances to help you communicate robustly.

    Keep your ‘eyes fresh' so you can maintain a healthy sense of perspective. This is where understanding our audience deeply comes in. We pose five questions in the first part of our So What Strategy process to help untangle this.

    These questions help us work out who really is our audience and what we need to do to engage them in our idea. It is not at all uncommon for this analysis to change not just what we think we need to communicate, but who we communicate to.


    Remember the influence of egos – our own and others. This is essential if we are to learn from others both as a giver and receiver of information. As a communicator, we may fear criticism too much and hesitate to share our good ideas. As a receiver, we may be too critical if we think someone else’s idea will upend our own achievements.

    The risk is that we are too invested in our ideas to expose them to proper critique and that we bump into others’ egos by not having sufficiently navigated around what mattered to them.

    Create the right balance between proximity and distance. Sufficient distance gives us perspective and clarity (aka putting our storyline in a drawer for an hour and getting lunch before checking it), but too much means we don’t see the issues that matter. Being removed from the consequences of our decisions can be a real trap.

    We offer specific strategies to help members ‘freshen their eyes’ so they can maintain a critical perspective when reviewing their communication.

    I hope that helps and look forward to sending you more ideas from The Great Mental Models again next week.

    Kind regards,
    Davina


    PS – The Clarity First Waitlist is now open. Add your name to the list so you hear when the doors will before anyone else. We are limiting participation to 50 new members this time.

    PPS – I receive a small commission if you click the link and decide to purchase a copy of Shane's book from Amazon.

    Related posts include

    From this series …

    1. A fabulous thinking tool to help you solve problems and communicate
    2. Further thinking tools  
    3. Thinking Tools #3 – Using Inversions to identify gaps in our thinking
    Past posts on thinking skills ..
    .
    1. How to use your critical thinking abilities to turbo charge your communication
    2. Strengthen your critical thinking abilities
    3. 4 Ideas to make structured thinking stick

     

     

     

     

     

     

    PRESENTED BY DAVINA STANLEY

    Davina has helped smart people all over the world clarify and communicate complex ideas for 20+ years.

    She began this work when she joined McKinsey & Company as a communication specialist in Hong Kong where she helped others use the Minto Pyramid Principle. She continued helping others when living in New York, Tokyo and now back in Australia.

    Her clients include experts across many disciplines across Australia, Asia Pacific, New Zealand, the UK and the US. She currently coaches a number of C-suite executives as well as many mid-level folk.

    Get her 4 Tips for Communicating Complex Ideas here.